Travel, and New Work

It’s been a very busy few weeks in my little corner of the universe. (**Long post warning!!)

Another interview for YORK, and then sorting and packing and shipping things in advance of an extended stay on the East Coast of the country!

I’ve been travelling for the last 2 + weeks … in Montreal for the wedding of two lovely friends. Had a great few days in Montreal; lovely food, and beautiful architecture in the old part of the city, where we were staying. Had a great visit to Pointe-à-Callière, and spent a good bit of time strolling through the cobble streets of Vieux Port. Also got a chance to visit with some friends living there, and explore some other parts of the city. I really love the way life is lived on the street there; there’s a constant energy, and so much visual input. A feast.

love this one!!
love this one!!
another alley artwork
another alley artwork
an alley mural
an alley mural
Pointe-à-Callière
Pointe-à-Callière
a side street; love the buildings
a side street; love the buildings
another view of the video at Pointe-à-Callière
another view of the video at Pointe-à-Callière
A video installation at Pointe-à-Callière, a really interesting archeological and historical museum in Old Port Montreal
A video installation at Pointe-à-Callière, a really interesting archeological and historical museum in Old Port Montreal
Historical Reenactment
Historical Reenactment
Place de Jacques-Cartier
Place de Jacques-Cartier
a fire escape in Old Montreal
a fire escape in Old Montreal

After Montreal, I headed to the Bay of Fundy – one of my favourite places on the planet – a perfect place to decompress a bit, get reacquainted with the Atlantic Ocean … and to make work. These photos are all from Cheverie, NS. It’s stunningly beautiful, and there’s really nothing to compare to the power of the tides (the link I’ve supplied is to a place I have been to, but not on this trip; it’s just around the shore from where I was).

IMG_5751 IMG_5769 IMG_5796 IMG_5797 IMG_5798 IMG_5799 IMG_5801

While my partner was doing some research on the area (he’s a structural geologist), I got busy myself, and created a site-specific installation/durational performance, called Fault/Line. I am quite happy with this work: with how it tested my limits physically, how it pushed me technically and conceptually, to make work within the material and temporal constraints that made sense in that place. I like this way of working and the many challenges it poses. I didn’t know I could still lift that much weight!

Here’s a composite-panorama of the work, just after it was finished:

Fault Line. An ephemeral, site-specific installation and durational performance. Created August 31 2013.
Fault Line. An ephemeral, site-specific installation and durational performance. Created August 31 2013.

A full slide show and more details on this project can be found HERE>

… And now, I’m in Halifax, starting to get settled in, slowly (at least all the stuff I’ve shipped has arrived, but we’re not unpacked and sorted yet … that will come). I will be out here for a while – making work, writing, thinking, and talking to the ocean. For my partner, this time is a research sabbatical; I am treating it in much the same way – as a self-directed residency. A time to shift gears, think about all I have been doing and making in the last couple of years. TIme to go deeper. Make more work. Take more risks. Hibernate and ruminate.

You’ll likely hear more from me in the next while, as this little sabbatical unfolds.

A change in season, a change in space

Well. It’s been a while! Despite my best intentions to get back into a regular routine here, I’ve been consumed with getting things sorted post-exhibition-opening: clearing out the AIR studio for the next person, securing a second (small, but soon to be mighty) workspace so I can actually move between supplies, worktable, and storage (thinking ahead to when all the work comes down too!), getting new projects sorted and underway. OH, and catching up on all the other ‘stuff’ that has needed doing for the last while, and that I’d semi-successfully swept under the large carpet called “ignore.”

And these shifts come at an altogether appropriate point: the change to the long, dark half of the year here. That time if hunkering down, daylight saving, soup and stew, fires and sweaters and hot tea. I really appreciate that the residency officially had its end on October 31; a day of ancestors, of looking back in time and thought, that pause for review and acknowledgement before moving forward again.

SO – on with it, back to it.

First on the long list was to bid a fond farewell to my big residency studio, pack everything back into my original (somehow very much smaller than it was!) studio, and prep for the next Harcourt House Artist-in-Residence to arrive.

… back to big, white walls, and being able to see the floor!

The AIR previous to me, Dave Janzen, had done a fantastic job of prepping the space for my arrival, and I only thought it fitting to extend that gesture – pay it forward, as the saying now has it – and do the same on my leave-taking.

… ready for more …

So, out came the spackle, the sanding blocks, the primer and paint. Walls, once covered with charcoal dust, pushpin and nail holes, were now in reasonably sensible shape. Got the place swept and emptied too!

It was a little sad to say goodbye to this studio – I had spent many, many hours there making work. A bit odd too, to see the space so empty again (people keep telling me I made a lot of work this past year … I believe them now!!)

Some little gestures toward continuity in other ways were here too. Some of the previous Artists in Residence had left behind little tokens to signify their presence and work in this space. Tim Rechner (AIR 2005-2006) wrote above the doorway “keep building it up” … and no one has removed or covered that call to action and intent. I found it a good reminder on a number of levels, to be sure. Dave Janzen (AIR 2010-2011) left behind an image printed on a piece of corrugated cardboard: a quirky vintage image of a small boy in short pants, grinning in a most disturbing way from under an equally disturbing haircut (you can see the bit of card on the wall, beside the shelf in the picture above). I left a little something too: an experimental gel transfer on plexiglas, showing a series of nests in a bank of trees. These small things do far more than assert the ego-driven “I was here” – to me, to me they are marks of presence that address ideas of history and continuity in the art-making in that studio … they are an ongoing welcome, and an invitation to more.

Of course, doors often close and open simultaneously.

… just down the hall, new adventures to come …

I was extremely fortunate that another studio came available in the building, just down the hall from my studio!  I’d put my name in for a second space quite some time ago, in anticipation of needing the room after the residency finished, and especially after the exhibition work comes down later this month! I’m still very much in the early stages of getting things sorted, out of tubs and boxes, and into the “right” studio – this space will be for messy work, and my original studio will be a ‘clean’ space for storing work, drawing, research and writing, and printmaking.  More pictures to follow of the new space, when it’s been sorted and painted!

This second space is also a marker of a different sort – it heralds the beginning of a brand new project! I will be sharing this space (and my original studio) with Marian Switzer to develop a photo-based body of work called YORK. I’ve discussed it a bit previously here – but there’s much more to come in the next while, as the work develops and the pieces fit together. Look for a static page and a separate blog on the project, coming very soon!  I am really excited about the way this work is coming together already, and I’m really looking forward to digging deeply into it over the next while.

… and with that, I should really get on with the ‘to do’ list!