Artist Statement

My practice explores the ways in which humans negotiate identity and memory in relation to land/place, objects, and history. That we construct realities and identities for ourselves and others is a given, as is the constructed nature of the various narratives of place and history within which our understanding is situated. Like all stories, what is left out is as important as what is chosen. What is chosen (and what becomes ‘real’ or ‘true’) changes over time, and depends upon who is doing the telling, and why. 

The conceptual focus of my practice has its roots in literary theories of subjectivity, feminism, and phenomenology. I actively seek opportunities to work in ways that expose gaps in understanding: what’s left unsaid; edited or incomplete narratives; in-between states and places. These contingent and/or liminal positions house the potential for new meanings, for critique, for failure, for incorporating indeterminacy and process as inherent to the work itself.

My approach is multidisciplinary, rooted in the senses and the body in space, and is often site-responsive.  I employ whatever tools seem to work best for a given idea, including photography, drawing, printmaking, installation, video, audio, sculpture, and performance – often in combination or ‘conversation’ with one another. This multi-pronged approach allows for the  reassembly and questioning of relationships, and the authority invested in different ways of knowing and recording information.  

I have created bodies of work exploring loss, grief, and identity (Nest, 21st Century Nesting Practices), the arbitrariness and assumption of authority in human-defined boundaries (Boundary|Time|Surface, Archives of Absence), the connections between home and place (Make=Believe, York, and York:Moments), and the connection between landscape/site, scales of time & scientific discourse (Fault/Line, Boundary|Time|Surface, Macromareal). I use a multidisciplinary approach in my practice, including photography, drawing, printmaking, installation, video, and ephemeral sculpture. These tools allow for ‘hands-on’ reassembly and questioning of relationships, and a variety of means to reflect upon the construction and interpretation of lived experience.

 

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