Sherds Shards Shorelines

Some simple, beautiful work here. A thoughtful dialogue with the land, and our impact upon it as part of an ongoing process of creation …. and destruction. Here, as in all things, we truly do reap what we sow. Nice to know that occasionally that the product can also be beauty.

heritagelandscapecreativity

East Coast

With Holocene sunsets

Shore

New materials wash

across

our shores

Beach Sediments

Continued sedimentation of humanity

Diverse Materials

Ancient intermingling

salt,

stone,

seaweed,

shell

Sherds

Cast wide –

a strange catch of sherds

Shards

Cast deep –

a strange haul of shards

Worn Faces

Fragmentary people

Fragments

With broken vessels

Sherd deposits

Cross the line,

tread with care

Tideline

Tide hides,

washes removes

different ways

Sherd and Shard

Tide Reveals,

recedes deposits

new realities

with

plastic in our hands

mould marine disrespects.


The Sherds and Shards were found in July 2017 on the shoreline of a small cove on the east side of Eilean Na Hearadh (Isle of Harris) in the Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles).   Overlooking the cove is a house, that originates from the late 18th century, the waste from which was probably flung by its residents into the sea for over two hundred years.    The sherds and shards have remained upon the shoreline and have become transformed by tidal rhythms and storms, scoured…

View original post 149 more words

4 Comments

  1. settleandchase says:

    Wow I love the sense of time here Sydney..it’s always so fascinating finding small parts of people or a persons life, especially more so now with every day so documented, there’s even more so a sense of peace in finding clues from small, unspecified fragments..

    Like

    • sydney says:

      Absolutely! I find myself drawn to all the questions situations like this expose – the how and why and when of human interactions with the landscape. There’s something so satisfying about holding a small, real thing that all the phone pics in the world can’t come close to.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. artswriter1anderson2donovan says:

    Thank you for this lovely post. I recognize one of the china patterns as Royal Doulton Mikado, or the pottery blue ware called Blue Willow.How the water works on them is moving- they were once clay… glass was sand. Your arrangement of the sherds is beautiful. Thank you. Ruth

    On 20 November 2017 at 11:36, sydney lancaster: hand & eye wrote:

    > sydney posted: “Some simple, beautiful work here. A thoughtful dialogue > with the land, and our impact upon it as part of an ongoing process of > creation …. and destruction. Here, as in all things, we truly do reap > what we sow. Nice to know that occasionally that the pro” >

    Like

    • sydney says:

      The work belongs to one of my favourite members of the WordPress community – not mine! I do love the way the familiar and unfamiliar meet in this work, how change and process and interconnection become so evident through these simple genstures.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: